Sales Questions

Never “ever” go blind into a sales call

You’ve finally got the attention of that prospect you’ve been chasing. You can’t believe it. After the 12th attempt, they answered the phone and, whoa, they agreed to an appointment to meet with you! However, as tempting as it may be to get off the phone before they change their mind — stop. Don’t make that silly assumption. You’ve got to plan your call. Never “ever” go in blind to a sales call. Here’s a key question to ask your prospect once they agreed to meet with you…

#2 Infiltrating Key Accounts — Disrupting Entrenched Competitors

Entrenched Competitors Welcome back to our series on How to Disrupt Entrenched Competitors and Win The Business You Deserve! One big challenge we face when it comes to disrupting an entrenched competitor — and infiltrating key accounts — is calling on the wrong people. Too often, we end up trying to cultivate relationships with prospects that don’t have the foresight, the vision, or the receptivity to embrace our ideas. So what’s the answer?  Call on the right people. Often, these are corporate-level executives (the C-Suite), people who control the budgets, have the final say, understand the big-picture needs, and are Read More…

How to Qualify A Sales Opportunity

It’s impossible to qualify a sales opportunity if you don’t know what it actually means to do so. For too many salespeople, a qualified sales lead is someone who checks all or many of the boxes next to the criteria you’ve identified for a promising prospect. Or, a qualified sales lead is someone who was identified by your marketing department and vetted by a member of your sales force. In order to truly qualify a sales opportunity, you need to do more than review your checklist of criteria for a lead you think is qualified and dig deeper than your Read More…

Never Ask These Two Questions To Disrupt Your Competitor Vendor Relationship

When someone tells you they’re happy with their current vendor, how do you respond? If you’re like many salespeople, you’re tempted to one of these two questions:   1.“What is it that you like about your vendor?” 2.“What is it that you don’t like about your vendor?” While it may seem natural to ask those questions, they’re actually very dangerous. Why? Because there’s a good chance your prospect’s response to the first query is only going to reinforce their positive feelings for their vendor and their commitment to stay with the supplier. When you ask a prospect what they don’t Read More…